The large “chief” sign stands adjacent to the railroad tracks in historic downtown Durango, Colorado, an advertisement for the Toh-Atin Gallery across the street. The sign depicts a Native American man clad in blue jeans, and vest — which many see as a caricature perpetuating harmful stereotypes. (Jeremy Wade Shockley, Special to The Colorado Sun)

A cartoonish Native American towering over Durango has divided the city. Should “the chief” stay or go?

The fate of the sign should be determined by “enlightened dialogue and not through mob rule,” says Ben Nighthorse Campbell, who wrote federal law protecting some monuments.

Culture Primary category in which blog post is published
Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Colorado mitigation “bank” to offset wetland damage, meet Clean Water Act rules

For the first time in 20 years, a new Clean Water Act mitigation bank breaks ground on the Front Range

Business Primary category in which blog post is published

What’s Working: Will Colorado become the nation’s precedent for extended benefits?

Plus: More small business grants, a D.C. update and how to move to PUA

SunLit Interviews Primary category in which blog post is published

Laurie Marr Wasmund watched a single volume of her historical novel mushroom into a trilogy

The author of "To Walk Humbly" mixed Colorado's real-life heroes and villains of the 1920s with fictional characters in this final installment of the White Winter Trilogy