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Durango

Durango

Opinion: Durango voters show the power of putting students over politics

Colorado activates municipal drought response for second time ever as water forecast worsens

Several cities say they are preparing for what is almost certainly going to be a dangerously dry 2021

Front Range residents tossed out 28% more trash than their rural Colorado neighbors last year

Recycling report from Eco-Cycle shows Colorado recycled less last year and created more trash

Dylan Redwine murder trial delayed after defense reports virus symptoms

Judge Jeffrey Wilson declared a mistrial in Mark Redwine's trial after a week of jury selection in the case

Durango’s ridiculed Bridge to Nowhere suddenly has clear road ahead

After a decade of delays and legal fights, the largest project in the history of that region of southwest Colorado will ease traffic and safety problems

Colorado River cutthroat trout restored to Hermosa Creek near Durango

Some estimates show cutthroats are now found in just 14% of their historic natural habitat

For Colorado’s rural seniors, coronavirus strains access to home-based care — just as it’s needed most

The pandemic has strained already short-staffed caregiving services, leaving seniors in southwest Colorado without much of the support they need to survive.

Purgatory and Silverton Mountain float interest in Silverton’s community ski hill

Two southwest Colorado ski area operators are interested in working with the Town of Silverton to grow the remote community’s Kendall Mountain ski area into a year-round amenity

Accessibility challenges persist in many rural Colorado communities

Mountain communities are notorious for accessibility barriers, particularly for people with impaired mobility, advocate says. “People live in these communities, become disabled and then leave.”

Here’s who funded the last-minute, $1.5 million attacks on Andrew Romanoff in Colorado’s U.S. Senate primary

The latest campaign finance filings show John Hickenlooper continued his fundraising juggernaut, but Cory Gardner still has more cash in the bank

A cartoonish Native American towering over Durango has divided the city. Should “the chief” stay or go?

The fate of the sign should be determined by “enlightened dialogue and not through mob rule,” says Ben Nighthorse Campbell, who wrote federal law protecting some monuments.

Storm damage to delay Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad’s service for months

The railroad's line from Durango to Silverton is expected to be out of service for the next eight to 16 weeks.

Coronavirus collapsed America’s food system, but created “a pivotal and magical moment” for locavores

The frailty of industrial agriculture was exposed when restaurants and huge meat processing plants closed. But Colorado farmers and ranchers have responded to spur a return to locally produced meat and potatoes.

Ute tribes reimagine Bear Dances, a key ceremony of renewal, as coronavirus locks down Colorado reservations

As Colorado eases coronavirus restrictions, Ute Mountain Ute and Southern Ute tribal councils have voted to maintain strict protective measures

Unsheltered and expecting: A southwest Colorado couple could lose their children if they don’t find housing

Living at Purple Cliffs near Durango has kept them safe from coronavirus, but without running water, the county-sanctioned encampment isn't shelter enough to satisfy agencies charged with protecting children.

How students stuck in Colorado dorms re-create college life by themselves

Only a few hundred students still are on campuses in Greeley, Grand Junction, Gunnison and Durango. And the road less traveled leads to a quiet, dreary dorm room, where online classes, reheated meals and longing for connection await.

Woman taking refuge in southwest Colorado church hits 1,000 day mark

Rosa Sabido, a Mexican national, has been trying to gain legal residency in the U.S. for decades after moving to Cortez with her mother when she was 23

Rural Colorado sees more broadband options coming online. But getting up to speed is taking longer than anticipated in some areas.

The expansion goes nicely with the state’s goal to get rural Colorado up to speed -- to 92% by June from 87% today

Judge: Federal government’s lawsuit against Durango railroad over 2018 wildfire should proceed

In July, the U.S. government named the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad as the cause of the 416 Fire

Parked: “Priced out of our hometown,” rising lot rents squeezing out mobile-home park residents

Even for Durango's middle class, the numbers don't always add up to an affordable housing option -- and some point the finger at corporate park owners

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