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The Colorado Trust

The Colorado Trust

In a Colorado long-term care facility during coronavirus, and desperate to get out

There are significant barriers that keep people in nursing homes that they would rather not live in. Affordable housing is a huge one.

Six months after eviction, a Denver woman wonders if she’ll ever have stable housing again

With winter approaching and COVID-19 cases on the rise, renters in arrears and housing advocates are all grateful for the eviction moratoriums, but say it’s far from enough.

Denver aims to raise awareness of steadily worsening air quality on the Front Range

Metro Denver has this year recorded the highest number of particulate warning days — the form of pollution exacerbated by wildfire smoke — in at least 10 years.

Air pollution, asthma rates in Colorado’s San Luis Valley are a growing concern

About 14% of San Luis Valley children suffer from asthma, which is a medically significant higher number than the 12% U.S. average. Can monitoring air quality help?

Pairing mental health counselors with police on calls shows promise in Colorado

Colorado's marijuana taxes funded 10 co-responder programs that dispatch mental health pros with cops. Two years in, the concept seems to be working in cities along the Front Range.

Colorado teens pregnant during coronavirus face increased isolation and difficult decisions

Still children themselves, teenagers have needs that differ from older parents, and the pandemic has made their pregnancies even more challenging.

Black-owned businesses weighed down by coronavirus struggle to stay afloat

Businesses in underserved neighborhoods of Colorado say federal pandemic-relief programs didn't come through for them, so they are leaning on private foundations or going it alone.

For Colorado’s rural seniors, coronavirus strains access to home-based care — just as it’s needed most

The pandemic has strained already short-staffed caregiving services, leaving seniors in southwest Colorado without much of the support they need to survive.

Coronavirus moved some substance treatment services online in Colorado — possibly permanently

Private and group therapy sessions are now happening over Zoom. Clinicians in rural areas are connecting with clients over the phone. Even AA took 12-step programs online. For many, it's working well.

Accessibility challenges persist in many rural Colorado communities

Mountain communities are notorious for accessibility barriers, particularly for people with impaired mobility, advocate says. “People live in these communities, become disabled and then leave.”

30 years after passage of Americans with Disabilities Act, key inequities remain in Colorado

The biggest remaining hurdles for people living with disabilities continue to be accessible housing and fair employment opportunities

In rural Crowley County, a safe return to in-person school is really the only option

The challenges of distance learning hit schools on the high plains of southeast Colorado especially hard. With fewer resources than larger, wealthier urban districts, Crowley County relied on dedicated educators to try to fill the gap.

Meals on Wheels is still delivering in western Colorado — but without the side of conversation

About 400 people get Meals on Wheels delivered daily in Mesa County, its drivers serving as an extra pair of eyes for worried families. But COVID-19 has changed all the rules and clients now are missing the company they used to provide.

A cartoonish Native American towering over Durango has divided the city. Should “the chief” stay or go?

The fate of the sign should be determined by “enlightened dialogue and not through mob rule,” says Ben Nighthorse Campbell, who wrote federal law protecting some monuments.

For diabetes patients, new health threats and cost concerns surface during coronavirus

Racial and income gaps in diabetes management and access to care are worse than ever in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Devastated by weather and the coronavirus pandemic, Western Slope farm workers try to hold on

In Palisade, the coronavirus outbreak and a crop-damaging spring freeze hit seasonal farmworkers particularly hard

Unsheltered and expecting: A southwest Colorado couple could lose their children if they don’t find housing

Living at Purple Cliffs near Durango has kept them safe from coronavirus, but without running water, the county-sanctioned encampment isn't shelter enough to satisfy agencies charged with protecting children.

Anxieties familiar and new persist for Coloradans living with disabilities during coronavirus

The economic shutdown related to COVID-19 has complicated the lives of Colorado people with disabilities, who find their routines upset, their jobs at risk and their quest for affordable, accessible housing more difficult.

Coronavirus is triggering a range of emotions in Colorado kids

Kids from toddler-age on up are wrestling with unfamiliar stressors created by the coronavirus. Experts say the way adults behave can set an example that lasts a lifetime -- for better or for worse.

What happens to school-based health care in Colorado when schools close because of coronavirus?

Colorado’s system of 52 school-based health centers has grown into a crucial element of overall population health, delivering more than 100,000 visits last school year.

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