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Election 2020

Colorado vote tracker: Here’s a look at turnout in the 2020 election

A statewide analysis and breakdown of the top 11 counties shows Democrats hold the vote edge in Colorado

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Updated at 9 a.m. Nov. 5, 2020

Colorado voters are casting ballots in droves ahead of the 2020 election, pushing vote totals toward new levels.

As of 9 a.m. Nov. 5, 3,295,192 people had cast ballots, or 78.7% of total registered voters, a Colorado Sun analysis shows.

This is the second presidential election in Colorado with mail ballots — and an unusual one. The coronavirus pandemic and attention on mail ballots is driving numbers to all-time highs and scrambling traditional turnout patterns.

Unaffiliated voters — those not aligned with a political party — have turned in the most ballots with 1,197,706 (36.35% of the total), followed by registered Democrats with 975,826 (29.61%) and Republicans with 865,625 (26.27%).

In Colorado, mail ballots are sent to all active registered voters and began to hit the mail Oct. 9. The vast majority of the votes cast to date are mail ballots. Only 2% came from in-person voting, according to the state. People may register to vote and cast a ballot until 7 p.m. on Election Day. 

Here’s a look at who is voting — and totals for the 11 largest counties, which account for 84% of registered voters in the state.

About the numbers: The Colorado Sun receives vote data directly from the Secretary of State’s Office. This data may differ from the daily reports released by the office because The Sun’s tracker is updated more frequently.

This page will be continuously updated.

VOTER GUIDE: What you need to know about the 2020 candidates, mail ballots and how to vote in Colorado


Colorado counted 4.1 million voters at the start of October, according to the latest figures available. That’s a 10% increase since the 2016 election, up 386,687 voters.

The nearly 2.8 million Colorado voters who cast ballots in 2016 ranked the state fourth in the nation in turnout at 71.9% of the eligible voting population, according to the U.S. Elections Project.

The 2020 turnout is exceeding the previous presidential election, but it’s important to note that the initial numbers were artificially inflated because voters began to receive their ballots four days earlier.


The partisan breakdown of the vote in Colorado

The largest bloc of voters in Colorado are not aligned with a political party. These unaffiliated voters lean Democrat — by a roughly 60-40 split, based on prior election figures. The true number of middle-of-the-road swing voters is closer to 10%, experts say.

Democrats outnumber Republicans in terms of statewide voter registration. The breakdown is 1,215,277 Democratic (30%), 1,111,615 Republican (27%), 1,707,347 unaffiliated (42%), and 75,326 from other parties (2%).


Adams County

Adams County in the Denver metro area is one of the state’s top swing territories.

The registered voters in the county total 307,037 — split 33% Democratic, 22% Republican and 43% unaffiliated. In 2016, Clinton won 49.9% and Trump received 41.3%.

As of Nov. 5, 70.81% of registered voters in Adams County had cast their ballots.


Arapahoe County

Arapahoe County is a bellwether in the Denver metro area.

The registered voters in the county total 449.469 — split 32.7% Democratic, 23.8% Republican and 41.8% unaffiliated. In 2016, Clinton won 53% and Trump received 39%.

As of Nov. 5, 75.20% of registered voters in Arapahoe County had cast their ballots.


Boulder County

Boulder County is a liberal bastion in Colorado, situated north of Denver along the mountain foothills.

The registered voters in the county total 259,604 — split 43% Democratic, 13.4% Republican and 42% unaffiliated. In 2016, Clinton won 70% and Trump received 22%.

As of Nov. 5, 80.45% of registered voters in Boulder County had cast their ballots.


Denver

Denver is the capital city and the state’s largest and most Democratic terrain.

The registered voters in the county total 508,595 — split 45.8% Democratic, 11.5% Republican and 40.8% unaffiliated. In 2016, Clinton won 74% and Trump received 19%.

As of Nov. 5, 74.88% of registered voters in Denver had cast their ballots.


Douglas County

Douglas County in the southern Denver metro area is reliably red territory that is slowly shifting as unaffiliated voters rise.

The registered voters in the county total 271,298 — split 19.9% Democratic, 38.6% Republican and 40.8% unaffiliated. In 2016, Clinton won 37% and Trump received 55%.

As of Nov. 5, 82.84% of registered voters in Douglas County had cast their ballots.


El Paso County

El Paso County, home to Colorado Springs, is considered the Republican hub in Colorado.

Registered voters in the county total 500,998 — split 20.6% Democratic, 35.5% Republican and 41.6% unaffiliated. In 2016, Clinton won 34% and Trump received 56%.

As of Nov. 5, 72.81% of registered voters in El Paso County had cast their ballots.


Jefferson County

Jefferson County is a sprawling county that equates to prime swing turf in the Denver metro area.

The registered voters in the county total 450,982 — split 29.5% Democratic, 25.5% Republican and 43.3% unaffiliated. In 2016, Clinton won 49% and Trump received 42%.

As of Nov. 5, 80.89% of registered voters in Jefferson County had cast their ballots.


Larimer County

Larimer County in northern Colorado is home to Fort Collins and a near-even major party split.

The registered voters in the county total 274,450 — split 27.2% Democratic, 27.5% Republican and 43% unaffiliated. In 2016, Clinton won 48% and Trump received 43%.

As of Nov. 5, 78.18% of registered voters in Larimer County had cast their ballots.


Mesa County

Mesa County is home to Grand Junction, a Republican bright spot on Colorado’s Western Slope.

The registered voters in the county total 115,975 — split 17.1% Democratic, 40% Republican and 41% unaffiliated. In 2016, Clinton won 28% and Trump received 64%.

As of Nov. 5, 72.98% of registered voters in Mesa County had cast their ballots.


Pueblo County

Pueblo County is the southern anchor of Colorado’s populous Front Range.

The registered voters in the county total 116,969 — split 36.9% Democratic, 25% Republican and 36.3% unaffiliated. In 2016, Clinton won 45.6% and Trump received 46.1%.

As of Nov. 5, 73.40% of registered voters in Pueblo County had cast their ballots.


Weld County

Weld County in northeastern Colorado is home to the bulk of the state’s oil and gas production.

The registered voters in the county total 211,714 — split 21% Democratic, 35.5% Republican and 41.7% unaffiliated. In 2016, Clinton won 34% and Trump received 57%.

As of Nov. 5, 74.14% of registered voters in Weld County had cast their ballots.

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