In this July 12, 2012 photo, dead, browned tamarisk lines the banks of the Colorado River as efforts to eliminate the invasive species appeared to be working. The small tamarisk leaf beetle, used to control the nonnative and invasive tamarisk plant, was released in 2004 along the Colorado River in Grand County. (AP Photo/The Salt Lake Tribune, Francisco Kjolseth)

Why planting tenacious tamarisk seemed like a good idea until it wasn’t, and other harrowing tales of Colorado’s invasive species

For scientists, preserving nature’s balance can mean love-hate-love relationships with everything from Dalmatian toadflax to horny beetles and jumping carp.

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published
Coronavirus Primary category in which blog post is published

Boulder County loosens coronavirus restrictions on 18 to 22 year olds

The change allows 18 to 22 year olds to gather publicly in groups of up to two people

Wildfire Primary category in which blog post is published

Cameron Peak fire continues to spread, destroy more structures as it becomes Colorado’s 3rd largest blaze

Officials said the fire grew Saturday by about 20,000 acres when winds reaching 60 mph caused the blaze to jump over fire lines. More structures were destroyed.

Coronavirus Primary category in which blog post is published

With winter travel to Colorado resort communities very unclear, airlines are showing “unprecedented” flexibility

What is usually a set-in-stone schedule of flights is an Etch-a-Sketch this fall as Colorado resorts struggle to gauge demand for skiing and airlines work to accommodate coronavirus-wary travelers.