Colorado River

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Determining how much water Colorado’s snowpack will yield is an inexact science, but researchers persist

The specter of climate change underscores the importance of gauging how well Colorado’s mountains can wring moisture from those enigmatic flakes

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

We know the earth is warming. We know that will stress water in the West. But we don’t know how.

Two critical, big-picture questions loom: How much snow will fall in the mountains and how much water will there be for the region’s forests, farms and cities.

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

How will Western water be affected by climate change? A tiny Colorado flower may have the answer

Researchers are scouring the landscape near Crested Butte to gather data and inform climate computer models used around the world

Outdoors Primary category in which blog post is published

Colorado rafting team falls short in second attempt at speed record down the Grand Canyon 

They finished in 37 hours, 55 minutes, missing the 34-hour, 2-minute record set by kayaker Ben Orkin in 2016.

Outdoors Primary category in which blog post is published

Colorado rafting team poised for second attempt at breaking speed record down Grand Canyon

U.S Rafting Team is back with a new raft design and veteran guides in mission to row 277 miles in less than 34 hours. 

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

BLM, citing public ire, demands intensive review of test bores before mine above Glenwood Springs can expand

Colorado River communities and U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton want close scrutiny of plan to grow a limestone quarry that many worry could disrupt Glenwood Springs' tourism economy and harm its beloved hot springs

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

U.S. water chief praises Colorado River deal, but she also sees challenges

The river supplies 40 million people in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming as well as a $5 billion-a-year agricultural industry

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Water crisis looms if Colorado fails to meet its legal obligations to other states, study warns

If water consumption increases by as little as 12%, the risk of Front Range spigots and farmland going dry doubles. But some call the findings scare tactics.

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

After decades of negotiations, restoration efforts on Colorado’s heavily diverted Fraser River are showing signs of success

Waterway improvements in Grand County are impressive, but with major Front Range water projects looming, environmentalists worry gains are just "a Band-Aid."