Colorado River

Outdoors Primary category in which blog post is published

Colorado is gearing up for its “biggest river surfing season ever”

New river parks, paired with big runoff flows, are setting the stage for an endless summer of surfing in Colorado.

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Changes were made to water flow out of the Glen Canyon Dam. And that led to more bugs in the Colorado River.

The number of adult midges throughout the Grand Canyon rose by 34% on weekends versus weekdays during last year's experiment

SunLit Interviews Primary category in which blog post is published

A Colorado author sought to add context to the Gold King Mine disaster. What he found was unexpected.

"Piecing together the history of the Gold King Mine was especially interesting, because it hadn’t really been done before," Jonathan Thompson said

Book Excerpts Primary category in which blog post is published

The roots of the Gold King Mine disaster run deeper than the river it polluted

In "River of Lost Souls," author Jonathan Thompson explores disparate forces -- including labor strife -- that ultimately led to missteps that tainted the Animas River

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Congress OKs “pain-sharing agreement” to deal with Colorado River drought, starting water-use cuts across seven states

The Colorado River Drought Contingency Plan was passed by the U.S. Senate on Tuesday, sending it to President Donald Trump’s desk

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

The plan to protect the Colorado River still isn’t done. Now what?

Here's a look at river and the drought plan and why it matters

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Arizona will miss deadline for Colorado River drought plan that impacts water for millions, officials say

Missing the March 4 deadline could allow the federal government to step in and decide the rules

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Arizona joins Colorado River drought plan just before federal deadline in effort to keep reservoirs from draining too low

The nightmare scenario for Arizona, California, Nevada and Mexico — which draw from Lake Mead — is a phenomenon called "dead pool," in which the level of the lake's surface falls below the gates that let water out