Pueblo

Growth Primary category in which blog post is published

Cities across Colorado saw how gentrification impacted Denver. They’re trying to avoid the same pitfalls.

Hot real estate markets put the state's city planners on alert to avoid displacing vulnerable populations, but with unique local factors in play

Business Primary category in which blog post is published

Dollar stores — 18 of them — have filled in gaps as conventional grocers pulled up stakes in Pueblo

Economic developers acknowledge an uneasy relationship with deep-discounters as Pueblo's economy tries to rebound

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Colorado’s booming pronghorn population is running horns-first into newly built neighborhoods

The state's 85,000 pronghorns are a wildlife management success story, but development on the prairie is conflicting with natural patterns

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

Pueblo will elect its first mayor in decades today. Here’s why the city hopes the move will be a watershed moment.

Nick Gradisar and Steve Nawrocki, both longtime fixtures in Pueblo politics, are running to be the city’s first mayor in roughly six decades

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

Ranked-choice voting could come to Colorado cities in 2019. Is the statewide ballot next?

DaVita CEO Kent Thiry, who helped lead recent successful ballot measures, is considering whether to back the "instant runoff" election system

Business Primary category in which blog post is published

Homes with no energy bills are catching on — even in Pueblo — and the extra cost isn’t as high as you’d think

A study that found building net-zero homes costs not much more than standard homes changed the trajectory of a Pueblo housing project. Now, more than 5,000 net-zero ready homes are proposed for Colorado.

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Jared Polis wants Colorado 100 percent powered by renewable energy, but talk is easier than the walk

At least 9 Colorado governments are working to wean themselves from coal and natural gas, but they say getting to 100% solar and wind power is harder than it seems.