Maggie Hanna's childhood home on Hanna Ranch, near Hanover southeast of Colorado Springs, is now the roof over the ranch hands' heads. The ranch on Fountain Creek has been in her family since the 1940s. Hanna's father died by suicide in 1998, when she was 9. Now she and other agricultural producers are working to make sure farmers and ranchers have access to mental-health services when and where they need them. (Nina Riggio, Special to The Colorado Sun)

For farmers in a mental health crisis, it’s often tough to seek help. A Colorado program aims to begin conversations.

Amid uncertainties over tariffs and declining income, suicides are increasing in Colorado and rates are higher in rural areas than in urban environments

Health Primary category in which blog post is published

Opinion: Denver residents refused to wear masks during 1918 pandemic. What have we learned?

Enforcement was an issue. Residents routinely refused to wear masks even when threatened with arrest and hefty fines. Soon Denver had the highest fatality rate in the nation.

Opinion
SunLit Interviews Primary category in which blog post is published

Tracing the arc of her life, Emily Wortman-Wunder explores the intersection of nature, humanity

In "Not a Thing to Comfort You," the author draws on her greatest personal challenge: Raising her children to love nature while honoring their suburban lifestyle

Book Excerpts Primary category in which blog post is published

Humanity and nature, mother and son, fulfillment and regret — a field guide

In a short story from her debut collection, author Emily Wortman-Wunder melds her love of wildlife and short fiction into a heart-wrenching meditation