Wind turbines near Matheson, Colo., are part of Xcel Energy's new 600 megawatt Rush Creek Wind Project. Rush Creek, which became operational in October 2018, uses 300 turbines to generate enough electricity to power 325,000 homes. Xcel estimates the project will cut 1 million tons of carbon emissions each year from its system. (John Leyba, Special to The Colorado Sun)

Xcel Energy, Colorado’s largest utility, aims to have zero carbon emissions by 2050 in industry-first plan

Xcel Energy says it's responding in large part to climate change and its goals will affect eight states where the company operates

Energy Primary category in which blog post is published

Littwin: As we mourn Ruth Bader Ginsburg, we are also forced to mourn the state of our democracy

Trump wants a vote on a Supreme Court nominee before the election. For Cory Gardner, who has already dodged the question, the nightmare would be that he’d have to make the deciding vote.

Opinion

Nicolais: Clowns to the left, jokers to right, Michael Hancock in the middle continuing to govern

Between constant attacks from people like Candi CdeBaca and Steffan Tubbs, Mayor Michael Hancock has dealt with a pandemic and protests with aplomb

Opinion