Erin Martinez, whose husband and brother were killed when their Firestone home exploded in 2017 because of a leak from a nearby oil and gas well, lobbies for tougher oil and gas regulations at an event Feb. 28, 2019, at the Colorado Capitol. (Jesse Paul, The Colorado Sun)

Colorado lawmakers are using the deadly Firestone explosion as a fulcrum for change — just as Erin Martinez wanted

Erin Martinez, whose husband and brother were killed in the 2017 Firestone home explosion, knew her tragedy would be politicized if she spoke out in support of Senate Bill 181. And the blast has become front and center in the bill's debate.

Energy Primary category in which blog post is published
Education Primary category in which blog post is published

Denver schools could soon have too few students — meaning consolidation might be coming. Here’s why.

By 2022, Denver Public Schools predicts there could be as many as 19 schools with fewer than 215 students, which would cost the district $3.4 million in subsidies

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Colorado wildlife officials have already put down 12 bears this year. Can a new Denver Zoo exhibit help reverse the trend?

Denver Zoo’s Harmony Hill aims to teach visitors how to keep bears -- and themselves -- safe