Skip to contents

greenhouse gas

greenhouse gas

Colorado governor releases final plan to reduce emissions by 90%. It’s still too vague, environmentalists say.

The Air Quality Control Commission is responsible for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from millions of vehicles and industrial and office buildings

An environmental group claims 70% of Colorado’s greenhouse gas emissions come from oil and gas. But that’s in dispute.

350 Colorado’s worst-case scenario modeling suggests oil and gas should be gone from the state by 2030 to slow climate change.

Colorado is behind on targets to cut greenhouse gas emissions. How far should the state push industry to get there?

Critics say the governor's roadmap is guided by "wishful thinking" rather than binding mandates to cut emissions blamed for climate change.

Opinion: Colorado needs to get on track to meet greenhouse-gas targets

Tri-State increases the amount of greenhouse gases it will cut in Colorado by adding wind and solar generation

Colorado's second largest electricity provider is now on par with other utilities for carbon dioxide reduction, but it will need to stop buying coal-fired power from elsewhere to do it

Anticipating a bust, the Colorado coal town of Craig gets an unexpected boost

Northwest Colorado is grieving the looming loss of a major industry and the pandemic has hurt. But the broader economy is beginning to perk up. "We are not victims," Craig chamber boss says.

Colorado oil and gas emissions rules begin to tighten, but gaps open over what is monitored, by whom and where

Western Slope commissioners say rules designed to pull the Front Range into federal ozone compliance are an “economic risk” for northwest Colorado

Opinion: Want to support Colorado firefighters? Take action on climate change.

Colorado must cut half of its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. It will lean on oil and gas to do it.

Coal plant shutdowns and cleaner vehicles are helping make progress, but oil and gas must scrub 7 million metric tons of emissions with no rules to guide it.

A Boulder County zip code produced the nation’s most greenhouse gas per person, study says

The zip code that produced the most greenhouse gas per person was in the mountains of western Boulder County, where the 23,811 pounds per person is 18 times higher than in the San Francisco zip code

Drafting rules to reduce Colorado’s greenhouse gas emissions may prove even harder because of missing data

The state's Air Quality Control Commission doesn’t expect new rules to be in place for another year

Colorado may have missed a deadline to plan for reducing greenhouse gasses. Now the state faces a lawsuit.

Some critics say what is lacking is a lead from Gov. Jared Polis

Larimer County coal-fired power plant will close 16 years early as Colorado speeds move toward renewable energy

Shut down of Rawhide Unit 1 leaves only a few big coal burning plants in Colorado without retirement dates as utilities feel pressure from customers, government to meet climate goals

Opinion: Ozone is more serious for Colorado than greenhouse gas emissions

Mountain athletes push progress over perfection in climate fight

Protect Our Winters’ embrace of “imperfect advocacy” is designed to motivate large-scale action on climate change. “We can’t afford to have anyone be silent right now," said athlete Caroline Gleich.

We know the earth is warming. We know that will stress water in the West. But we don’t know how.

Two critical, big-picture questions loom: How much snow will fall in the mountains and how much water will there be for the region’s forests, farms and cities.

Agriculture is part of the climate change problem. Colorado wants farmers’ soil to be part of the solution.

With more statewide support, farmers and ranchers hope to boost the health of Colorado's agricultural lands and conserve water while also meeting business goals.

Trump’s “energy dominance” push changing plans for 3 million acres of Colorado land, local stewards say

State and local agencies -- and more recently, Gov. Jared Polis -- prioritized conservation during years of public input and discussion. Now those objectives are in jeopardy.

A tiny garden in Boulder is showing signs of stress from smog. The scientist behind it is thrilled.

Four types of plants growing near the entrance to NCAR are part of a nationwide network of gardens where citizen scientists and climate researchers collect data about the impact of ground-level ozone

Opinion: Lakewood voters don’t deserve praise; they deserve condemnation