coal energy

Energy Primary category in which blog post is published

Larimer County coal-fired power plant will close 16 years early as Colorado speeds move toward renewable energy

Shut down of Rawhide Unit 1 leaves only a few big coal burning plants in Colorado without retirement dates as utilities feel pressure from customers, government to meet climate goals

Energy Primary category in which blog post is published

A federal court ruled a coal company couldn’t build a road on public land near Paonia. The company did it anyway.

The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in early March eliminated an exception that allowed a coal mine expansion in the Sunset Roadless Area

Energy Primary category in which blog post is published

Tri-State’s clean energy battles with two Colorado electric co-ops now threaten the utility’s finances

A week-long hearing is set before the Colorado Public Utilities Commission in an attempt to determine reasonable exit fees for United Power and La Plata Electric Association

Energy Primary category in which blog post is published

Western Slope utility serving Delta, Montrose settles on $136.5 million fee to break up with Tri-State

The fight between Delta-Montrose Electric Association and its power generating partner has dragged on since 2016 and led Tri-State to be more flexible in its remaining contracts.

Energy Primary category in which blog post is published

The closure of Colorado coal-fired powerplants is freeing up water for thirsty cities

Large electricity generators use lots of water to cool their coal-fired plants. As those units shut down, expect to see battles heat up over how the massive amounts of water can be repurposed.

Energy Primary category in which blog post is published

Wyoming coal interests funneled money, experts to influence Colorado PUC decision on closing parts of Pueblo plant

The Coalition of Ratepayers, a group formed by the Denver-based Independence Institute and which received money from out of state, still couldn’t stop the shutdown of Comanche Station units in Pueblo.

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Most used wind turbine blades end up in landfills. Colorado is part of the push to make the industry greener.

Wind energy industry leaders don't like the optics — even if the old blades don't pose environmental harm — and Colorado could see a new generation of recyclable, repairable blades