Directors of eight state offices of outdoor recreation, left to right, Colorado's Luis Benitez, Montana's Rachel VandeVoort, North Carolina's David Knight, Oregon's Cailin O'Brien-Feeney, Utah's Tom Adams, Vermont's Michael Snyder, Washington's Jon Snyder and Wyoming's Domenic Bravo, show the freshly signed Confluence Accords atop the Le Meridien Hotel in Denver on July 25. (Jason Blevins, The Colorado Sun)

Eight states — including Colorado — sign “Confluence Accords” pledging ethical recreation as a path to economic prosperity

The Confluence Accords outlined a roadmap for the states to promote conservation and stewardship of lands

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

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Growth Primary category in which blog post is published

Aurora officials say water in Colorado is increasingly difficult to find. So they’ve tapped an inactive mine.

Like other Colorado cities, Aurora is searching for new sources as its population grows