Articles By Colorado Humanities & Center for the Book

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Melding fantasy with Greek mythology proved challenging — but also a lot of fun

L.D. Colter, back to back Colorado Book Awards winner in Science Fiction/Fantasy, researched 1950s Athens but also created her own underworld

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An image, an old cookbook and a writer’s instinct inspired a novel of compelling family dynamics

Author Elisabeth Hyde also called on her journals during her work on a presidential primary campaign to add depth to the story

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A chance visit to two historic grave sites set in motion the author’s wish to cast Billy the Kid in her fiction

Many writers had explored the gunfighter's life. Diana Holguin-Balogh's challenge was to do so in a way no one had before her.

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From a dream job that was not without its risks came the inspiration for outdoor thrillers

Author J.M. Mitchell's career with the National Park Service informs his writing. But he needed extra research on how his Kenyan counterparts did their job.

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How a discarded title for her previous book became a Colorado author’s inspiration for the next one

"Burning Ridge" didn't quite fit the last K-9 mystery Margaret Mizushima wrote. But it set her on a course for a new type of crime novel.

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From Cyclops to a woman literally disappearing in the mist, a Colorado author explores the meaning of home

In "Awayland," Ramona Ausubel also tackles love and loneliness, and explains why Cyclops is not "the worst guy on the internet"

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After 25 years, it was time for 5280 magazine to release a collection of its best pieces

For editor Geoff Van Dyke, though many of the anthology's stories seem dark, they nonetheless have an uplifting and hopeful side as well

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Writing “Bitterroot” allowed author to add humanity to data from her previous work on transracial adoption

Susan Devan Harness not only found writing her own account cathartic, but she says it also "laid a lot of my ghosts to rest"

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An inheritance of diaries and documents led to a 10-year journey that produced “WWI Crusaders”

Author Jeffrey B. Miller's grandparents played important roles in an underappreciated chapter of World War I history, as U.S. aid workers helped avert mass starvation in Belgium