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Colorado Humanities & Center for the Book

SunLit interview: As an animal lover traumatized by burglars, R.L. Maizes knew she had the makings of a novel

In "Other People's Pets," the author sought to explore whether an individual traumatized during childhood could rise above the experience to live a normal life

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SunLit interview: A nightmare and quantum physics set Catherine Wallace Hope on a novel course

The author wanted to get the plot of her science fiction/fantasy tale just right -- but in order to do that, she paid particular attention to the science

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SunLit interview: Molly Tanzer melded World War II with the supernatural to continue a tradition of “secret histories”

The author of "Creatures of Charm and Hunger" spun a tale of individual resistance to evil by a character largely confined to her home. Any parallels to the COVID crisis were purely accidental.

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SunLit interview: How a family estate battle turned Collin Brantmeyer into a novelist

The divisive elements of that experience, plus an episode of "This American Life," gave the author lots of material for a whodunnit -- and also offered an alternative to therapy

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SunLit interview: Pemba Sherpa had a story to tell but little time to write it. Enter James McVey.

The author and former CU professor joined forces with Sherpa to produce "Bridging Worlds," a memoir of life in both the Himalaya and Colorado. For McVey, it was an education.

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SunLit interview: Cary Unkelbach’s beloved dog Max spurred her curiosity about his breeder’s bizarre life

The author's previous experience as a reporter and both a prosecutor and civil litigator gave her the tools to follow the trail of the breeder who managed to keep her animal abuse from friends and family

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SunLit interview: How Stephanie Harper’s story of agoraphobia unexpectedly found an audience

She finished her novel in 2013, but "Wesley Yorstead Goes Outside" didn't find its way to print until seven years later, when the isolation that followed the coronavirus made it a "pandemic read"

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SunLit interview: How Dylan Fisher’s fever dream became a game to create the longest sentence

The author notes that his sentences seldom came to a full stop, "and, thus, the question of 'what comes next' never came up for me"

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SunLit interview: Two writers nurtured the annual RMFW anthology into a life of its own

Rachel Delaney Craft and Natasha Watts brainstormed a theme for the collection. Once they settled on "Wild," the authors took the prompt in unexpected directions.

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SunLit interview: Raised on Colorado history, Randi Samuelson-Brown gravitated to its notorious elements

Family travels throughout the West piqued her interest. When she started tracking down the stories, one of her biggest challenges was unraveling accepted accounts.

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In runes, author Marc Graham found a method for solving problems like writer’s block

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Author Jodi Bowersox launched her sci-fit series as an extension of a previous character’s writing

But how would she handle a romance between a human and an android? That premise led to many other questions she'd have to resolve in her Mars-based plot

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Poet Art Elser looked back at life-changing events to fill his collection “It Seemed Innocent Enough”

He finds inspiration all around him, and in life experiences like serving in Vietnam. But his poetic role model was a woman who never stopped writing -- and published a book of her verse at 100.

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Daniel Guiet pieced together his father’s clandestine life slowly, from a discovery at age 5

The unusual details of the family's life moving to outposts across the globe finally came together when some wartime exploits were declassified, and a detailed account could be assembled

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Cindy Burkart Maynard’s visits to the archeological sites of ancient Puebloans sparked a novel idea

The author of "Soyala: Daughter of the Desert" produced a work of historical fiction that adds to the speculation about abandonment of a Four Corners civilization

SunLit Interviews

Jennifer Kincheloe built her stories around a relatively little-known venue for women’s rights

In the early 1900s, women in police custody were at the mercy of an entirely male system. Police matrons addressed that problem, and provided rich characters for her novels.

SunLit Interviews

Author Todd Fahnestock wrote “The Undying Man” for one really compelling reason: his fans

SunLit Interviews

Catherine R. Berra has been writing poems since she was a girl. Last year, she finally published some.

SunLit Interviews

Christmas Eve with grumpy grandchildren inspired Natli VanDerWerken to write her book

With family tempers rising, the author sat in her living room and restored calm with a magical tale that became "WindRunner," one in a series of novels

SunLit Interviews

In “That’s How It Is,” poet Jared Smith celebrates the struggle and dignity of the American worker

From traveling to all 50 states to a wide-ranging work history -- including as an advisor to President Clinton -- the author's life experience laid a broad foundation for his writing

SunLit Interviews
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