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Most of Colorado’s largest districts are now only offering remote instruction

A Chalkbeat analysis of the 30 largest districts in the state shows 22 are now fully remote.

Curtis Durham helps his son, Wyatt, 10, with schoolwork at home on Wednesday, March 25, 2020, following the closure of JeffCo Public Schools in response to the new coronavirus. Durham is considering homeschooling his two children. He’s giving homeschooling a trial run while his kids learn online through the district. (Dagny Durham, Special to The Colorado Sun)

This story was originally published by Chalkbeat Colorado. More at chalkbeat.org.

Most of Colorado’s students now must learn from home — a stark contrast to just weeks earlier.

In November many school districts switched to entirely virtual learning. A Chalkbeat analysis of the 30 largest districts in the state shows 22 are now fully remote. Of the remaining eight that still provide some in-person instruction, only three offer it to students of all grade levels.

The Roaring Fork school district is one of those three districts. Officials there are pleading with the community to help lower COVID rates so that schools can continue to offer in-person instruction, while also preparing families for disruptions.

“As much as we value in-person learning, the only way we will be able to maintain it is if our whole community can take responsibility for reducing social gatherings and taking all of the precautions that limit the spread of the disease,” Rob Stein, Roaring Fork’s superintendent, wrote in the district’s Thanksgiving bulletin.

He also described the district’s challenges and said some teachers are working “at an unsustainable pace.”

Some districts that are otherwise entirely remote, such as Jeffco and Poudre, are still opening some classroom spaces to students with disabilities or other vulnerable populations.

The 30 largest districts serve more than 83% of the students in Colorado’s public schools.

Read more at chalkbeat.org.


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