Lance McDonald, director of programs for Telluride, on the deck of the just-opened 18-unit Boarding House, where 46 workers pay as little as $385 a month to live dormitory-style. When McDonald arrived in Telluride in the 1980s to work as an intern at city hall, he squatted in a cabin on U.S. Forest Service land. "How nice would this have been when I first got here?” he asked. (Jason Blevins, The Colorado Sun)

Telluride isn’t immune to Colorado’s high country housing problem. But it’s finding a solution in diversification

In Telluride, a constricted canyon of about 2,600 residents, housing programs have focused on options, meaning everything from dorm-style rentals and tiny homes to stand-alone single-family homes and four-bedroom apartments

Growth Primary category in which blog post is published
Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

Here’s what the crowded Democratic field for U.S. Senate is missing, and why it may soon change

Former Colorado House Speaker Alice Madden is expected to enter the contest. Secretary of State Jena Griswold is mulling a bid.

A Nazi flag led this Western Mayberry to confront hate once again. Now Fruita aims to send a different message.

A rural Colorado town makes its history of inclusivity its new mantra: “This was a wake-up call for us.”

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

Former Colorado foster youth make themselves heard for “sibling bill of rights,” driver’s license bill

The two proposed bills are the result of a generation of foster youth who are louder than any before them