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resort industry

Climbing coronavirus cases in Colorado’s high country aren’t tracking back to ski resorts

Health officials in eight counties have not traced positive tests back to lift lines, chairlifts or ski slopes.

A Vail employee in an empty lane between lines of skiers reminds skiers to keep their masks over their nose. (Jason Blevins, The Colorado Sun)

Colorado appeals court agrees that ski pass waivers protect resorts from liability in chairlift injuries

The Colorado Court of Appeals ruling on lift ticket and season pass waivers -- which release ski areas from “any and all liability” -- could erase resort safety responsibilities outlined in laws like the Ski Safety Act and the Colorado Passenger Tramway Act

Up to 55 injured skiers and snowboarders arrive at Colorado emergency rooms each day, analysis shows

More than 4,100 skiers and snowboarders were transported to emergency rooms in ambulances or helicopters across 2018, 2019 and the first part of 2020, which is about 10 patients every day of the season.

Coronavirus-wary Colorado skiers are willing to sit out this season, poll shows

A Magellan Strategies survey of Colorado skiers reveals apprehension over pandemic protocols, reservations and visitors. “I can go a year without skiing downhill,” one woman said.

Masks up! Colorado ski resorts are moving ahead as state, counties and businesses restrict access

Colorado requirement for isolation housing for ill guests challenged resort industry planning, but hotels and lodges will have rooms to quarantine people who fall ill on ski vacations

Colorado is trying to figure out what to do when ski country visitors catch coronavirus

One of the stickier points in managing the spread of COVID-19 in Colorado’s resort towns involves what to do when a guest falls ill during their stay and can’t leave.

Judge’s forceful rejection of Trump’s ban on visa workers may come too late for Colorado ski resorts

A district court ruling suspends a ban on J-1 and H-2B visa workers, opening doors for ski areas that rely on the seasonal immigrant workers. But resorts that typically have visa employees on deck by fall are seeing surging applications from locals.

With winter travel to Colorado resort communities very unclear, airlines are showing “unprecedented” flexibility

What is usually a set-in-stone schedule of flights is an Etch-a-Sketch this fall as Colorado resorts struggle to gauge demand for skiing and airlines work to accommodate coronavirus-wary travelers.

Travel within Gunnison has been restricted to residents only during the COVID-19 pandemic. People traveling from out of county or the state of Colroado must inform the Health Department of the number of people arriving, where they will be staying if they are a 2nd home owner and must have their own supplies and be self quarantined for 7-10 days. Gunnison County has 108 positive COVID-19 cases and 5 deaths and is one of the most highly infected areas per capita in Colorado.

Coronavirus has cost Vail Resorts more than $200 million. So far.

North America’s largest resort operator posted a rare year-end loss, dragged down by early resort closures and a pandemic-slowed summer. But Epic Pass sales are pacing ahead of last year.

Retailers are seeing spike in backcountry gear sales. That has avalanche educators, search teams worried.

As ski resorts announce plans to manage crowds, avalanche equipment sales are soaring, leaving search and rescue teams and land managers bracing for record crowds exploring snowy mountains.

Bluebird Backcountry is expanding just as uphill skiing is expected to explode during coronavirus

The uphill-only ski area outside Kremmling is expanding to 1,200 acres for its second season with an emphasis on providing a safer experience and avalanche education.

Skiers begin their day at Bluebird Backcountry in mid-March. The state's first-ever human-powered, backcountry ski area drew hundreds of skiers to slopes spilling from the prominent Whiteley Peak outside Kremmling. (Shondia Houtzer, Special to The Colorado Sun)

COVID exodus fills vacation towns, including Colorado’s high-country destinations, with new medical pressures

From the shores of Long Island to the resorts of the Rocky Mountains, traditional vacation destinations have seen a major influx of affluent people relocating to wait out the pandemic

How Colorado’s independent Wolf Creek ski area plans to navigate a coronavirus reopening

Unlike Vail Resorts, which last week announced a reservation system that requires pass holders to book high-season ski days well in advance, Wolf Creek is adjusting its pricing

Want to ski at a Vail Resorts mountain during coronavirus? You’ll need a reservation.

Forget the dreamy scene where you wake to a foot of fresh and race to the ski area

Trump’s ban on visa workers breathes new life into college-age ski bumming in Colorado’s resort towns

Ski area operators are reporting a surge in applications from college students and locals as hiring strategies, operational plans shift in the pandemic.

Purgatory and Silverton Mountain float interest in Silverton’s community ski hill

Two southwest Colorado ski area operators are interested in working with the Town of Silverton to grow the remote community’s Kendall Mountain ski area into a year-round amenity

He wasn’t the best skier, but he was Colorado’s preeminent ski bum. Farewell, Charlie Toups.

“Everyone seemed to know him. … He lived life in such a unique way,” a friend recalls of Charlie Toups, a quintessential Colorado ski bum who spent decades living in cars in ski area parking lots.

Ski resorts push lift-ticket seller Liftopia toward bankruptcy, revealing deep impacts of coronavirus closures

Aspen Skiing Co., Alterra Mountain Co., Arapahoe Basin and others say they’re owed more than $2 million after the coronavirus ended the season early

Smaller ski areas retain their workers with help of federal coronavirus stimulus money

Granby Ranch, Hesperus, Loveland, Monarch, Powderhorn, Purgatory, Ski Echo, Ski Sunlight, Silverton Mountain and Wolf Creek qualified for a cumulative $5 million to $13 million in PPP loans, enabling them to keep employees paid during the pandemic

Report: U.S. ski industry lost $2 billion because of coronavirus

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