water

Business Primary category in which blog post is published

Sweet corn put Olathe on the map, but seeds of economic revival didn’t take

Olathe Sweet Corn Festival has moved to Montrose and the town still is wrestling with troubling changes back in the ‘80s that spurred grower John Harold to pitch ‘Olathe Sweet’ to the world.

Outdoors Primary category in which blog post is published

How technology is turning the South Platte River into a wavy, whitewater hot spot

Two hydraulic WaveShapers at Sheridan’s River Run Park have boosted Colorado river surfing big time, despite the challenge of down-to-the-drop demands on Colorado's water.

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Controversy over Denver Water’s Gross Reservoir expansion offers a glimpse into water woes in the West

Raising the 55-year-old dam near Boulder is essential to keep a stable water supply in a changing climate, utility says. Residents insist conservation could be just as effective.

Outdoors Primary category in which blog post is published

MAP: At least 22 people have died on Colorado’s rivers and reservoirs this year amid fierce runoff

The Arkansas River has been the deadliest stretch of water in the state so far, with three deaths

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Even after a rush of snow and rain, the thirsty Colorado River Basin is “not out of the woods yet”

It will take as many as 13 water years exactly like this one to erase the impacts of long-term drought in the West, Colorado River District engineers say

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Colorado said a quirky artesian mountain spring has to be capped. Residents are trying one last Hail Mary to save it.

People in Teller County and beyond have used the spring at Gillette Flats, near Cripple Creek, as a free water source for generations

Environment Primary category in which blog post is published

Colorado Springs’ downtown creek has long been viewed as a blight. Then one man started catching trout in it.

Colorado Springs is one of only a few remaining Front Range cities without a creek or river being regularly used for recreation. “There’s so many opportunities," said Alan Peak.