state budget

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

Colorado treats marijuana taxes like “a piggy bank.” But now top lawmakers want to limit spending to two areas.

Colorado budget writers want to prioritize spending marijuana tax money on opioids and education, but it could mean cuts elsewhere

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

To pay for housing and roads, Colorado lawmakers turned to an unusual source: the public’s “lost and found”

Colorado State Treasurer Dave Young, a former legislative budget writer, warns about using reserve accounts and putting budget “at risk”

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

A breakdown of the 8 issues Colorado lawmakers will study before the 2020 legislative session

The Democratic-led General Assembly is analyzing topics ranging from school safety and college affordability to private prisons and tax breaks

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

$120 million in requests and $40 million in the bank. How an obscure theory helped prioritize the Colorado budget.

State Rep. Chris Hansen made Colorado one of the first test cases for quadratic voting in the public policy realm in the 2019 session

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

Here are the most-lobbied bills in Colorado’s 2019 legislative session. The list may surprise you.

The paid family leave bill drew the most lobbying attention through March, but other hot-button bills had less money spent to track them

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

Colorado lawmakers plan to remove $2.3 billion transportation question from ballot, delay it to 2020

Colorado legislative leaders are concerned about an increasingly crowded 2019 election ballot with substantial spending questions

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

Colorado schools will get more money thanks to new estimates. And homeowners can expect to pay more.

Democratic lawmakers don't plan to go along with Gov. Jared Polis' plan to freeze the property tax rate, saying it's not worth the political effort

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

What the $30.5 billion Colorado state budget means for you — yes, you

The spending bills for fiscal year 2020 includes pay hikes for state employees, more money for education and dozens of other programs favored by Democrats.

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

Colorado lawmakers want to eliminate spending caps. Here’s how the TABOR overhaul would work.

Any additional revenue would go toward K-12 schools, transportation and higher education in Colorado