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Colorado Springs Utilities

Colorado Springs Utilities

Opinion: Delays in closing Colorado coal plants are costly in money and air quality

Order to close three Colorado coal-fired power plants early reversed, regulators cite “incomplete” information

Colorado’s Air Quality Control Commission said issues around closing plants a year early were too complex

As pandemic hammers its finances, Vail pulls out of state cloud seeding program

Vail Resorts says it can't afford to cover 20% of the $1.5M Colorado spends to trigger more snow and ultimately more water.

Three coal-burning power plants in Colorado face orders to close early. Their owners aren’t happy about it.

Tri-State, Xcel and Platte River Power had the closures slated for 2030. But Colorado air quality regulators say it must be done earlier to meet greenhouse gas targets.

Wildfires make work to reduce Colorado’s greenhouse gas emissions even more crucial, Gov. Polis says

In an address to state air-quality regulators, Polis reaffirmed ambitious climate-related goals. But some say the roadmap to reach them lacks urgency.

We now know how many billions of gallons of water Colorado will save by closing coal-fired power plants

By 2031 water use for coal-fired power plants in Colorado will drop to 3.7 billion gallons – a 68% reduction, according to the Energy and Policy Institute.

Colorado may have missed a deadline to plan for reducing greenhouse gasses. Now the state faces a lawsuit.

Some critics say what is lacking is a lead from Gov. Jared Polis

Colorado Springs will shut down its two coal-fired plants by 2030. Now it’s time for Xcel to do the same, environmentalists say.

Coal-burning turbines at Martin Drake will be temporarily replaced with natural gas units as Colorado Springs Utilities builds new electric transmission lines

Larimer County coal-fired power plant will close 16 years early as Colorado speeds move toward renewable energy

Shut down of Rawhide Unit 1 leaves only a few big coal burning plants in Colorado without retirement dates as utilities feel pressure from customers, government to meet climate goals

The closure of Colorado coal-fired powerplants is freeing up water for thirsty cities

Large electricity generators use lots of water to cool their coal-fired plants. As those units shut down, expect to see battles heat up over how the massive amounts of water can be repurposed.

Colorado’s lights, broadband must stay on during coronavirus. Here’s how utilities are keeping their workers safe.

Pandemic plans are being dusted off. In Colorado Springs, where 7 people have died, utility workers have been issued personal protective equipment so they can make gas, carbon monoxide safety checks.

Aurora, Colorado Springs own water near Leadville. They may need to redraw a wilderness area to access it.

The first step for the Front Range cities, which want to act on their decades-old water rights, is to drill test bores for a proposed dam that would flood a Holy Cross Wilderness access road

A $60,000 solar project, with no money down: A Colorado program helps businesses finance renewable energy projects

29 Colorado counties have opted in to C-PACE, Colorado Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy

The most thrilling commute in Colorado: How Grizzly Reservoir’s caretakers keep water flowing

Married couple among the army of longtime custodians making sure water from the remote reservoir east of Aspen makes it to thirsty populations in Colorado Springs, Pueblo and Aurora

Fish ladders and boat chutes part of a massive dam rebuild on the Arkansas River

In the process of rebuilding a diversion to get river water to thirsty cities, Colorado Springs and Aurora collaborated with wildlife, environmental and recreational interests for ambitious infrastructure upgrade

Colorado Springs has big plans for its downtown. But first the city must deal with the Martin Drake Power Plant.

The success of the city’s redevelopment plans -- including a U.S. Olympic museum and a downtown sports stadium -- depend on powering down the massive coal-fired electric plant, Colorado Springs' leaders say