Colorado budget

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

What the $30.5 billion Colorado state budget means for you — yes, you

The spending bills for fiscal year 2020 includes pay hikes for state employees, more money for education and dozens of other programs favored by Democrats.

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

These numbers describe Colorado’s economic outlook — and whether Polis will get full-day kindergarten

Gov. Jared Polis says there’s enough money to cover the cost of full-day kindergarten, but the state’s budget writers remain unconvinced

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

Democratic lawmakers want to ask voters in 2019 to end TABOR cap, but Polis is not so sure

The measure would amount to the most substantial effort in years to rollback the state’s unique limits on government spending

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

Jared Polis cheers a GOP tax cut plan, and his political allies shudder

The debate comes as a new report shows the gap between the effective tax rates of the rich and poor has grown wider in Colorado.

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

Gov. Polis says the federal shutdown isn’t impacting Colorado’s state budget — but that could quickly change

More than 2,200 unemployment claims related to the federal shutdown have been filed in Colorado

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

In exclusive interview, Gov. Jared Polis previews his legislative agenda and bold, new approach

The Democrat plans to move aggressively to implement his priorities, starting with executive orders as early as this week

Politics and Government Primary category in which blog post is published

The new Democratic majority in Colorado needs money for their ambitious agenda. Here’s where they could find it.

Colorado voters rejected tax increases but voted into office a slate of Democratic candidates promising big, and expensive, policies