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Education

Why reopening middle and high schools now seems more doable in Denver

Health advisers say COVID-prevention basics "work very well,“ as DPS board gets data showing students are showing up to their virtual classes but fewer are completing their assignments.

Rural Colorado communities vow to keep their schools open, even as coronavirus cases rise

Without evidence of the virus spreading in their schools, some districts will continue in-person learning. Their leaders worry what will happen to kids if they don’t.

Colorado school outbreaks nearly doubled in November as coronavirus cases surged

A Chalkbeat analysis found that K-12 schools account for 14% of outbreaks but only 5% of cases from outbreaks. Colleges and universities represent only 2% of outbreaks but 16% of cases.

Denver students set to return to classrooms in January

All Denver Public Schools students whose parents want them in school will be in class by Feb. 1

Most of Colorado’s largest districts are now only offering remote instruction

A Chalkbeat analysis of the 30 largest districts in the state shows 22 are now fully remote.

Changing priorities shaped Susana Cordova’s relationship with the Denver school board

The relationship between Cordova and the board is more nuanced than the open hostility implied by her supporters.

To test or not to test? Colorado educators and advocates divided on CMAS in a pandemic

Federal and state law require standardized tests — in Colorado, that’s CMAS for students in third through eighth grade

“Stretched thin”: Colorado superintendent survey highlights concerns with teacher burnout, learning loss

The findings highlight the problems school districts need to solve this year — and the potentially long-lasting consequences of a year or more of disrupted learning

Tens of thousands of Colorado kids still lack internet access. State stimulus dollars will only offer a short-term fix.

Lawmakers are devoting $20 million to help improve internet connectivity for students. Education leaders are grateful, but say the money won’t solve the root of the issue: inadequate infrastructure.

CU Boulder struggles to enroll low-income students. That has consequences for Coloradans’ social mobility.

University of Colorado Boulder is fifth-lowest among nation’s flagships in enrolling low-income students, thus slowing Colorado’s social mobility.

Reimagining Denver’s Livestock Exchange Building means respecting its distinctive past

The $8.5 million sale to a consortium clears the path to a modern beacon for agricultural ingenuity and preserves the building’s architectural finery

New Colorado coronavirus guidelines could mean fewer school quarantines, more in-person learning

"Targeted" quarantine would result in fewer cohorts or classes being disrupted after potential exposure to coronavirus

With plywood, glue and a lot of love, an Arvada couple is giving Colorado kids a place to study — one desk at a time

What began as a one-man hobby to help kids studying at home during the pandemic has turned into a volunteer operation to build 150 desks and counting.

How Colorado’s special legislative session could help child care providers and remote learners

Lawmakers are expected to provide relief for at least two education topics

Colorado governor establishes “back-to-school task force” to help districts offer in-person learning

Colorado does not have a statewide strategy for opening or closing school buildings during the COVID-19 pandemic

Denver’s current, former mayors say “dysfunctional” school board mistreated departing Superintendent Susana Cordova

The mayors’ statement echoes a letter signed by 14 former school board members, all of them women, that blames a “hostile work environment” in which the superintendent was “interrupted, talked over, and routinely discounted by board members.”

In Aurora, a bigger conversation about police in schools

In an open letter to the community in June, Aurora Superintendent Rico Munn argued that the phrase “defund the police” should not be seen as radical or scary

Pueblo teachers are battling a district requirement that they go to school, even though students are at home

One elementary school has had a dozen coronavirus cases this fall, forcing remote learning. Teachers say they don't feel safe.

As coronavirus drives more Colorado school districts to stop in-person learning, some neighboring charter schools buck that trend

Two Roads Charter School’s Arvada and Littleton campuses are continuing in-person instruction. Sending students home would harm them, leaders say. “COVID would be the least of their concerns.”

Facing “seismic shift” this year, Colorado educators pioneer through permanent changes to schooling

Colorado schools are trying to embrace technology’s leading role during the pandemic while also trying to create a level playing field

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