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More than 30 people applied to be Denver Public Schools’ new superintendent

The seven-member school board is ultimately responsible for hiring the superintendent. Board members have said they’re aiming to choose a new district leader by June

Students and community members march past East High school during a Black Lives Matter demonstration to emphasize the need for more black educators in schools in Denver, June 7, 2020. (Kevin Mohatt, Special to The Colorado Sun)

This story was originally published by Chalkbeat Colorado. More at chalkbeat.org.

From 10 to 12 candidates for the Denver superintendent job are expected to participate in a second round of interviews starting next week, the head of the firm conducting the search said.

A total of 32 applicants applied to lead Denver Public Schools, Colorado’s largest school district. Of those, 21 candidates did a first-round interview with the search firm hired by the school board, Alma Advisory Group, said Alma CEO Monica Santana Rosen.

The seven-member school board is ultimately responsible for hiring the superintendent. Board members have said they’re aiming to choose a new district leader by June.

The previous superintendent, Susana Cordova, announced in November that she was leaving to take a job in Texas after nearly two years as superintendent.

Cordova was the sole finalist in the last superintendent search and met many of the criteria that students, parents, and community members said they wanted. She grew up in Denver and spent her career as an educator in the district. Cordova was also the first Latina superintendent in a district where more than half of the students identify as Latino or Hispanic.

This time around, Rosen said school board and search firm members have met with more than 350 people over the past six weeks to talk about what the community wants to see in the next superintendent. Similar to last time, many participants said they’d like Denver to hire a superintendent of color who has significant experience as an educator, she said.

Read more at chalkbeat.org.

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