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Coronavirus

Pitkin County, with Colorado’s highest coronavirus incidence rate, is moving to red-level restrictions

The change means indoor dining will cease in Aspen. Outdoor dining, takeout and delivery at restaurants still will be available, though there will be an 8 p.m. last call and tables can only have people from the same household.

The Silver Queen Gondola on Aspen Mountain in March 2019. (Jesse Paul, The Colorado Sun)

With the highest incidence rate of COVID-19 in Colorado, Pitkin County will close indoor dining at restaurants Sunday and move fully into red-level restrictions.

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Monday’s unanimous decision by the seven members of the Pitkin County Board of Health also includes a 50% capacity limit on lodging in Aspen and Snowmass Village and assurances by Aspen Skiing Co. to improve COVID-19 protocols.

Ski mountains will remain open without a reservation system for the time being, though indoor dining at on-mountain restaurants will cease.

“We’ve communicated until our eyes are falling out,” said Pitkin County Commissioner Greg Poschman, also a member of the board of health. “Yet we still have a lot of people … not agreeing with us.

“It’s time. We have to do this. It’s painful. It’s not forever.”

Pitkin County is the first to enter level-red restrictions since Gov. Jared Polis last month allowed counties at level red, including Denver, to move to the less restrictive level orange on the state’s coronavirus dial.

Read the whole story at aspentimes.com.


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