Shauna Jackson and Alyssa Bravo, both interns for Haseya, help weed the medicine wheel healing garden in Colorado Springs on September 5, 2019. The garden consists of sage, tobacco, cedar, and sweet grass which are all traditional medicines. (Nina Riggio, Special to The Colorado Sun)

4 out of 5 Native American women are survivors of domestic or sexual violence. A Colorado Springs garden is helping them recover.

A vacant lot has been converted into the Haseya Indigenous Healing Garden, where Native women who have experienced violence can come together, garden, connect with others and use traditional ways of healing to make a life change

Coloradans Primary category in which blog post is published

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Outdoors Primary category in which blog post is published

Ski Cooper’s expanded expert terrain, financial vibrancy reveals model for nonprofit ski area management

Think of Ski Cooper as the craft-beer of Colorado's ski industry, said Dan Torsell, the area's general manager

Coloradans Primary category in which blog post is published

The Witches of Manitou Springs: History, hysteria and wand-waving Wiccans behind a stubborn urban myth

Focus on the Family is concerned enough to issue a warning, but it’s tough to actually track down someone practicing magick in the shadow of Pikes Peak

Transportation Primary category in which blog post is published

Electric-vehicle makers want to sell directly to Coloradans. Dealers say that’s a “solution in search of a problem.”

Senate Bill 167 would let all makers of EVs, including Ford, sell their electric SUVs directly to customers, bypassing dealerships