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Aspen Skiing Co.

Aspen Skiing Co.

Colorado ski resorts work to stay open as COVID cases snowball

The skiing itself doesn’t feel much different during the pandemic. But “the après ski scene is just gone,” one Telluride visitor said.

Up to 55 injured skiers and snowboarders arrive at Colorado emergency rooms each day, analysis shows

More than 4,100 skiers and snowboarders were transported to emergency rooms in ambulances or helicopters across 2018, 2019 and the first part of 2020, which is about 10 patients every day of the season.

Eager early-season crowds are helping Colorado ski resorts fine tune operations before the holiday crush

Ski areas are tweaking traffic flow, adjusting lift line mazes, revisiting uphill policies and repositioning workers as they adjust operating plans in the first few weeks of the strangest ski season ever

Masks up! Colorado ski resorts are moving ahead as state, counties and businesses restrict access

Colorado requirement for isolation housing for ill guests challenged resort industry planning, but hotels and lodges will have rooms to quarantine people who fall ill on ski vacations

Colorado is trying to figure out what to do when ski country visitors catch coronavirus

One of the stickier points in managing the spread of COVID-19 in Colorado’s resort towns involves what to do when a guest falls ill during their stay and can’t leave.

Judge’s forceful rejection of Trump’s ban on visa workers may come too late for Colorado ski resorts

A district court ruling suspends a ban on J-1 and H-2B visa workers, opening doors for ski areas that rely on the seasonal immigrant workers. But resorts that typically have visa employees on deck by fall are seeing surging applications from locals.

Trump’s ban on visa workers breathes new life into college-age ski bumming in Colorado’s resort towns

Ski area operators are reporting a surge in applications from college students and locals as hiring strategies, operational plans shift in the pandemic.

Ski resorts push lift-ticket seller Liftopia toward bankruptcy, revealing deep impacts of coronavirus closures

Aspen Skiing Co., Alterra Mountain Co., Arapahoe Basin and others say they’re owed more than $2 million after the coronavirus ended the season early

Colorado may have missed a deadline to plan for reducing greenhouse gasses. Now the state faces a lawsuit.

Some critics say what is lacking is a lead from Gov. Jared Polis

When skiing stopped, so did pooping. Wastewater workers in Aspen and Vail faced a pile of problems.

The science of keeping the flora in a sewage treatment system balanced was knocked out of kilter when coronavirus shut skiing down and water use dropped 50% in two of Colorado’s most popular ski communities.

The day skiing died: Inside the historic day coronavirus forced Colorado’s ski industry to shutter

Resorts wanted one more day to close since the shutdown happened as visitors from all over the country were flocking to Colorado for spring break. Gov. Polis said waiting would have led to more infections.

Hundreds of international workers at Colorado ski resorts are in limbo as countries close borders, airlines cancel flights

“It’s not that we want to stay. We just can’t leave,” says a ski instructor from Argentina who is among hundreds of J-1 and H-2B visa workers trapped in resort towns unable to get home.

Early closure of ski resorts triggers “feeding frenzy” for uphill touring and backcountry ski equipment

Vail Resorts put the brakes on use of its mountains for skiers seeking turns without lifts, but independent backcountry ski shops across the state are reporting record sales.

A pair of skiers skin uphill at Loveland Ski Area on March, 20, 2020, near Georgetown. With many closures in Colorado due to the coronavirus pandemic, many more skiers and snowboarders opt for uphilling equipment to keep skiing in the backcountry and on ski resorts without chairlifts running. (Hugh Carey, Special to The Colorado Sun)

Colorado ski resorts remain open, but change chairlift rules and dining options to avoid coronavirus spread

Large gatherings have been banned in Colorado ski counties to prevent the spread of COVID-19, but lift lines aren’t included so resorts are still open while mountains across Europe and Asia close for the season

Skiers ride the Paradise lift at Crested Butte Mountain Resort on Feb. 14, 2019. The Paradise lift accesses intermediate terrain in Paradise Bowl and the more difficult terrain of the North Face to the west and the High Lift to the east. The Paradise lift has taken much of the skier load up the mountain since the closing of the Teocalli chairlift at the beginning of the 2018-19 season. At times the Paradise lift has had its share of problems. Many skiers were forced to walk out of Paradise Bowl to the base after the lift stopped due to repair issues in weeks past. (Dean Krakel, Special to The Colorado Sun)

“He had it good and it wasn’t enough”: How a resort executive’s stolen-ski scheme shocked Aspen

A Pitkin County judge says Derek Johnson’s crimes -- including stealing and reselling skis for more than $3 million over 12 years -- dwarfs other embezzlement cases in the ritzy community.

Jake Burton Carpenter, a snowboarder first and foremost, leaves Colorado legacy of community and persistence

Colorado ski resorts lined up against snowboarding even after Jake Burton Carpenter persuaded Berthoud Pass to open to athletes "surfing" the snow in 1978.

“The industry as we have known it no longer exists”: A former Colorado ski area executive peels back the curtain

Chris Diamond’s new book, “Ski Inc. 2020,” is a study of the ever-shifting ski resort industry

Colorado’s rivers are starting to swell — but there are still feet of snow left to melt in the high country

Snowpack levels in some of the state’s river basins remain at about 50% of their peak. A man was killed rafting the Eagle River last week.

Hunger for uphill ski land has resorts, Forest Service looking at acres unused inside existing ski permits

Bluebird Backcountry, on the hunt for a home for its chairlift-free ski area, is exploring using thousands of ungroomed acres inside ski area boundaries

Aspen stakes claim as the premier human-powered playground as skiers ditch lifts and traffic to walk uphill

“Alpine skiers are getting bored," said Erik Lambert, a businessman searching for a mountain to anchor an all-uphill resort. "They are sick of crowds. They are sick of traffic. I think people are ready for a cultural shift.”

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