The GEO immigration detention center in Aurora on Monday, July 22, 2019. (Jesse Paul, The Colorado Sun)

BOSTON — More than a dozen state attorneys general are seeking answers from federal immigration officials about their decision to stop considering requests from immigrants seeking to remain in the country for medical treatment and other hardships.

Among the signatories is Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser, a Democrat.

The letter sent Wednesday to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement asks, among other questions, how immigrants with severe medical conditions can request deportation deferrals going forward.

“These grants of deferred action have prevented the deportation of gravely ill children and adults to countries where their lives would be in danger due to lack of quality medical care,” the letter says. “Deferred action has also given patients access to health insurance and allowed parents of sick children to receive work authorizations that they need to pay their children’s medical bills and support their families.”

ICE deferred commenting to USCIS, which didn’t respond to an email. USCIS said Monday it will continue processing deferral requests pending as of Aug. 7.

The letter is signed by attorneys general in Massachusetts, New York, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, Washington and the District of Columbia.

The Associated Press

Email: newsroom@coloradosun.com