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Culture

Forrest Fenn, art dealer whose treasure sent hunters scouring the West, dies

Police confirmed Fenn died Monday of natural causes at his home in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Can government investment in the arts help lift Colorado, the U.S. out of the economy’s coronavirus slump?

In light of the pandemic and resulting unemployment for creative workers, more than a few influential arts advocates have floated the idea of a New Deal for the arts.

Drive-in theaters in Colorado and beyond are seeing increased traffic with big-name concerts, events

Outdoor theaters are feeing the pinch of the slow rollout of new movies, but Garth Brooks and Metallica are keeping rural drive-ins afloat

To make beer slushies and beer ice cream, one Colorado brewery is breaking all the rules

Wiley Roots Brewing in Greeley is redefining beer and drawing new audiences as the craft brewing industry faces a pandemic pinch

Coronavirus killed 59,179 arts jobs in Colorado and crippled key economic and cultural engines. Can they be revived?

Local philanthropists are working on grants to support artists, venues and groups. But one study suggests reviving a massive, national New Deal-like program.

Namaste Noir: A Colorado yoga co-op seeks to diversify, heal racialized trauma

A growing body of research asserts that racism and discrimination may be playing a larger factor than previously thought in elevating risks for obesity and chronic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer among people of color. Can yoga help?

Take a tour of Denver’s beer history from home by pairing this new book with local breweries

“Denver Beer: A History of Mile High Brewing” captures the launch the city’s brewing scene during the gold rush and the spirit of modern craft beer innovators

Eager to experience Colorado in a different way, a Boulder woman set life aside to forge a new trail across the state

Starting at the Oklahoma-Kansas-Colorado border and headed toward the state’s northwest corner, India Wood is more than halfway through her expedition. She wanted to see more than just the prettiest, most popular places.

A new breed of veterinarian in Colorado provides fear-free treatment for man’s best friend. And cats.

Robin Downing pioneered the more specialized treatment now demanded for pets that have attained a higher status -- family. Sometimes that means playing reggae for dogs.

“We want to lead”: Frisco uses art to reckon with the high country’s lack of diversity

Frisco is the first known mountain community to host a Black Lives Matter mural as many cities, including Denver and Washington, D.C., have done

Telluride Film Festival canceled due to coronavirus

Organizers said Tuesday that the festival's 47th edition, scheduled for Labor Day weekend, was scuttled entirely due to the pandemic

“A big year” for Olathe sweet corn as pickers pluck first ears of the season

Grower John Harold estimates 35 million ears of corn will be harvested this season, most of it bound for King Soopers stores

Shifting cultural winds amplify calls to rename Colorado’s peaks, valleys and creeks

Mount Evans, Squaw Mountain and Chinaman Gulch are among the geographic landmarks that are being eyed for renaming

A climber admires the view from near the summit of Mount Evans in Colorado. Mount Evans, in the Mount Evans Wilderness, is 14,265' in elevation and the 12th highest peak in Colorado. Although a paved road, State Highway 103,climbs the mountain and stops just below the summit there are many challenging routes for climbers. This photo was taken after an ascent on Mount Evan's West Ridge. Evans was originally named Mount Rosalie but was changed to Evans in 1895 for John Evans, the 2nd governor of Colorado who resigned for his part in the Sand Creek Massacre. (Dean Krakel, Special to The Colorado Sun)

It’s not just Colorado’s mountains: Outdoor industry brands, climbing routes also targeted for name changes

Golden's Yeti Cycles may drop the word "tribe" to describe annual gatherings, and climbing route names are changing as people grow weary of appropriated words and offensive terms used to label events and places.

A cartoonish Native American towering over Durango has divided the city. Should “the chief” stay or go?

The fate of the sign should be determined by “enlightened dialogue and not through mob rule,” says Ben Nighthorse Campbell, who wrote federal law protecting some monuments.

How a new community of Black artists was born out of Denver’s police brutality protests

What started with volunteers spraying “Black Lives Matter” on temporary plywood boxes became a full-fledged exhibit in Denver’s Civic Center park

Why a global fight over airplane manufacturing is affecting wine lists in Colorado restaurants

A 25% tariff on wines from France, Germany and Spain was supposed to make Boeing more competitive against Airbus. But it has mostly caused havoc for wholesale wine businesses and their restaurant customers.

Opinion: National parks – even Mount Rushmore – show there’s more than one kind of patriotism

National Park Service sites like Mount Rushmore are public lands, meant to be appreciated by everyone, but they raise crucial questions about history, unity and love of country, especially during this election year.

Kindness Yoga called out: Weakened by coronavirus, 9 studios close after Instagram campaign exposes rift over race

A hashtag led to hundreds of cancellations just as the company was readying to reopen. But some teachers wonder how closing down helps Denver’s yoga community make progress.

Drone. Lights. Camera. Art. “Space-time sculptures” create one-of-a-kind works of art in Colorado’s mountains

Breckenridge artist Mark Bellncula flies his LED-mounted drone through as many as 93 waypoints to create light sculptures above Colorado’s mountain landscapes.

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